Podcast

CTS 153: Recap of 2018 & Starting 2019

We made it to the end of 2018! In our final episode of the year, we wanted to recap the show and its top episodes. There are some good episodes to listen to or if you already have, listen to them again!

Additionally, we wanted to share some brief stats about the show and how we’ve grown. Then we’ll share about what’s to come in 2019 for Clear To Send.

Top 10 Episodes of 2018

1 – CTS 137: MIMO
2 – CTS 106: 802.11ax with Broadcom
3 – CTS 108: Useful Wi-Fi Metrics To Track
4 – CTS 109: Ekahau Sidekick, Spectrum Analysis, & Finnish Rap
5 – CTS 123: Design Principles for Stadium Wi-Fi
6 – CTS 130: RF Characteristics
7 – CTS 107: What’s The Purpose of Cisco CleanAir
8 – CTS 138: CWNA with Coleman and Wescott
9 – CTS 134: Understanding the 4-Way Handshake
10 – CTS 125: 802.11 Frame Captures for Windows

Some stats:

  • 52 episodes for this year!
  • Now over 14k downloads per month
  • 4900 downloads in January 2018

Top countries:

  • 1 – US
  • 2 – UK
  • 3 – Australia
  • 4 – Portugal
  • 5 – Canada

Looking into 2019:

We are looking at providing some sort of Deep Dive into topics. Some of the content involved would include examples from real world data, how tests were performed, and the results we learned from the Deep Dive.

Additionally, we will look at including some video content to supplement the audio podcast.

When it comes to video, we may plan on doing a few webinars to answer questions from the listeners.

Links & Resources

Please take 5 minutes to fill out the listener survey

We’re nominated for the IT Blog Awards! Last day to vote for Clear to Send is January 4th, 2019. Please VOTE!

CTS 152: Naughty or Nice Wi-Fi

Does your Wi-Fi network make the Naughty or Nice list this December? Go through our top 5 bad and good checklist.

CTS 151: What It Means To Be a CWNE

In a previous episode, François discussed what it meant to be an engineer. We thought it would only be fitting to do an episode on what it meant to be a CWNE. They are two very different things. An engineer can be a CWNE but we feel that to be a CWNE can mean something different to other people.

This week we outline some of what we think CWNE means. It’s a certain kind of wireless professional. It’s not the end-all definition of a CWNE but really a definition from our point of view.

  • Professionalism
  • Troubleshooting
  • Soft skills
  • Confidence
  • Continual learning
  • Strong understanding of fundamentals
  • Credibility
  • People we can rely on when it comes to Wi-Fi related questions
  • Example/Mentor
  • Being part of a Network/Family (with other CWNE)

Listen to the episode to hear our full discussion on what it means to be a CWNE and let us know what your thoughts our down below in the comments section.

Links & Resources

CTS 150: Wi-Fi Design Day, NAC, Troubleshooting, C9800, and More

Stephen Cooper flies from Australia to San Jose to record in-person for Clear To Send. But really he was in town for work and made time to meet with me, Rowell, to talk about different topics in wireless.

Interview with Stephen Cooper

We met at the Westin hotel which happened to be the quietest place downtown due to a winter holiday event occurring.

He’s a Technical Solutions Architect for Cisco residing in Australia. Previously was the Ekahau SE for Asia Pacific working out of Australia. And before that he was at Dimension Data.

It’s challenging to find wireless guys who understand wireless and network access control such as Cisco ISE or Aruba ClearPass. At Dimension Data Stephen had to work on these types of projects. Network access control usually falls with the security team and the wireless guys don’t have much insight into how it’s deployed.

Troubleshooting is critical for wireless professionals. Understanding how the network should be working helps identifies root causes faster.

While at Ekahau, Stephen was very remote from the rest of the team. He met with a lot of customers where shifting their minds towards thinking about design first and understanding fundamentals. A vendor default is not vendor recommendation. And a challenge Stephen noticed at Ekahau is customers may not necessarily know that distinction.

When it comes to design, we often see that device types are forgotten and not considered into the design process. But the wireless community has been very good at bringing device types and their characteristics into light.

Moving to Cisco, Stephen has been able to work with clients on wireless designs, helping with migration strategies between controllers, helping customers understand how to get onto locations services network or VoIP ready network. He’s more focused on wireless and Cisco DNA – future architecture.

With Cisco’s next generation wireless architecture and intent-based network, Stephen thinks you have more flexibility with how you can deploy new controllers, but there’s still life in the AireOS controllers. There’s a large legacy install but they can still do telemetry you can use in DNA Assurance. You may not get the same level as detail compared to the C9800s.

Wi-Fi Design Day was born out of Ekahau and was started in the UK. It was meant to educate people but have it a community driven event. The first event was a huge success in London and when it was announced in Australia it was also popular. The event is unique where it’s vendor neutral with experts from multiple vendors talking about Wi-Fi as well as end users talking about their use cases. This event is much smaller and intimate compared to larger conferences.

Links & Resources

Twitter: Stephen__Cooper
Blog: wificoops.com