cleanair

CTS 153: Recap of 2018 & Starting 2019

We made it to the end of 2018! In our final episode of the year, we wanted to recap the show and its top episodes. There are some good episodes to listen to or if you already have, listen to them again!

Additionally, we wanted to share some brief stats about the show and how we’ve grown. Then we’ll share about what’s to come in 2019 for Clear To Send.

Top 10 Episodes of 2018

1 – CTS 137: MIMO
2 – CTS 106: 802.11ax with Broadcom
3 – CTS 108: Useful Wi-Fi Metrics To Track
4 – CTS 109: Ekahau Sidekick, Spectrum Analysis, & Finnish Rap
5 – CTS 123: Design Principles for Stadium Wi-Fi
6 – CTS 130: RF Characteristics
7 – CTS 107: What’s The Purpose of Cisco CleanAir
8 – CTS 138: CWNA with Coleman and Wescott
9 – CTS 134: Understanding the 4-Way Handshake
10 – CTS 125: 802.11 Frame Captures for Windows

Some stats:

  • 52 episodes for this year!
  • Now over 14k downloads per month
  • 4900 downloads in January 2018

Top countries:

  • 1 – US
  • 2 – UK
  • 3 – Australia
  • 4 – Portugal
  • 5 – Canada

Looking into 2019:

We are looking at providing some sort of Deep Dive into topics. Some of the content involved would include examples from real world data, how tests were performed, and the results we learned from the Deep Dive.

Additionally, we will look at including some video content to supplement the audio podcast.

When it comes to video, we may plan on doing a few webinars to answer questions from the listeners.

Links & Resources

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CTS 107: What’s The Purpose of Cisco CleanAir

Are you fully utilizing CleanAir to it’s maximum capability? We dive into the intricacies of Cisco CleanAir.

This episode is sponsored by Metageek

Sponsored by Metageek

Cisco CleanAir

Download your free CleanAir Reference Sheet PDF

The earliest Cisco WLC version where Cisco CleanAir was released dates back to the 7.0 days. Sometime around the year 2010. Cisco CleanAir is always on within an AP, granted if it is Enabled in the WLC. There is a Spectrum Analysis Engine (SaGE) chip built into the AP. This is important to know because it doesn’t prevent the AP from serving clients. SaGE works alongside the Wi-Fi chip. There is no affect to client throughput or traffic.

To enhance Cisco RRM’s features, CleanAir plays a critical role in allowing RRM to change channels if persistent interference is detected. CleanAir will field the appropriate algorithms to help the WLC make changes to improve an environment.

Cisco CleanAir produces two important elements:

  • Interference Device Report
  • Air Quality Index

The Interference Device Report (IDR) provides information on detected interference. It will provide a class type, what band the interference was detected on and on what channel(s), the severity of the interference, it’s duty cycle, and the interference signature.

The Air Quality Index (AQI) provides a quality score, from 0 – 100%, with 100% being good. The index will display total channel power, total channel duty cycle, the power of the interferer and total interference duty cycle.

A benefit of using Cisco CleanAir is having the ability to troubleshoot the shared spectrum remotely and without any additional hardware. A CleanAir supported access point can be utilized for this purpose. Some things to keep in mind when using your CleanAir access point for troubleshooting interference:

There are three modes:

  • Local – The AP will continue to serve clients on its operating channel. But any spectrum monitoring is performed on that channel only.
  • Monitor – The AP doesn’t server any clients but provides full time scanning.
  • Spectrum Expert Connect – This is a dedicated spectrum sensor and doesn’t serve any clients.

In times when the best response is to use technical support hands to troubleshoot the issue, having a method of automatically mitigating an interference issue can be highly beneficial. It can cut time to resolution down and react faster than a support team that is reactionary.

What we’d like to see from CleanAir is the ability to tell an administrator whether any action needs to be performed. While interference and air quality is determined on any given channel, does it even matter? Are any users impacted negatively? A smarter system would be able to detect interference and provide exactly which users are having issues directly related to this interferer and what kind of impact that is. And a step further would be to automatically adjust the system to fix the problem.

We’ve included some images of Cisco CleanAir in action from within Spectrum Expert and Metageek Chanalyzer.

Links and Resources and News

Giveaway

We are giving away CTS apparel of your choice. Either a CTS shirt or sweater! To enter, do the following:

  1. Enter the form below
  2. Follow @cleartosend on twitter
  3. Leave us a review on iTunes
  4. Let us know what was your most recent interference encounter in the comments below
  5. And don’t forget to tell everyone that you’ve entered #cts107 giveaway